GooReader vs Google Books


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GooReader
GooReader is a desktop app that allows you to read and download Google Books, add bookmarks, annotations, create a local Library and save books to PDF. GooReader allows to access your online Google Library and manage your personal bookshelves.
Windows PhoneWindows PC
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Google Books
Google Books is a service that searches the full text of books and magazines that Google has scanned, converted to text using optical character recognition, and stored in its digital database. Search and preview millions of books from libraries and publishers worldwide using Google Book Search. Discover a new favorite or unearth an old classic.

Latest news about GooReader and Google Books:



20.09.16. Google Books will now make better suggestions on what to read next. Google Books aims to offer a better challenge to Amazon’s Kindle app when it comes to helping you find new things to read. The new feature called “Discover” is a new section in the Google Books application that will help point users to new content, including both personalized suggestions as well as other recommendations based on what’s currently popular with the wider community. It will offer up new stories based on what you read on Google Books. However, it will also automatically suggest books that are mentioned in an article or mentioned in a video you watch, elsewhere in the app – like in the new “Weekly Highlights” section.



20.10.15. Google Books project ruled legal by U.S. appeals court. A decade-long legal battle looks to be finally coming to an end. A U.S. appeals court said that Google's book scanning project, Google Books, doesn't violate copyright law, Reuters reports. The decision comes after the Authors Guild, along with some non-guild-affiliated writers sued Google in 2005, claiming the company's project would negatively impact their revenue. The Authors Guild sued Google in 2005 claiming lost revenue, with a lower court in New York ruling in favor of Google in 2013. Google, for its part said its work would help increase author revenue by exposing potential customers to works they might not have been familiar with. The 2013 decision was upheld by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York on Friday, finding that Google's publishing of excerpts qualified as Fair Use and were in the public interest.



2013. Google Books survives the copyright fight. The eight-year-long legal battle between Authors Guild and Google Books has finally come to the end. New York, US Circuit Judge Denny Chin said the book scanning amounted to fair use because it was “highly transformative” and because it didn’t harm the market for the original work. “Google Books provides significant public benefits,” Chin wrote, describing it as “an essential research tool” and noting that the scanning service has expanded literary access for the blind and helped preserve the text of old books from physical decay. Chin also rejected the theory that Google's online book database was depriving authors of income, noting that the company does not sell the scans or make whole copies of books available. He concluded, instead, that Google Books served to help readers discover new books and amounted to “new income from authors.” The Authors Guild has now the option of appealing the ruling.